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Date: 4-15-2002
Price: 20.00
Design: Turn Left at Orion
Description: A great book for new amateur astronomers.

Review

Many beginning amateur astronomers are in the position that I was in several years ago when I started. I had just invested around $500 into an Orion 8-inch Deep Space Explorer Dobsonian and a few accessories. Orion was kind enough to include a software program to aid in locating different objects, but I still didnít know what to look at. I could find a few objects of course. The Moon and the brighter planets were easy. The Orion Nebula was a piece of cake. I could also find a couple of galaxies. However, after that I ran out of things to look at pretty quickly. It was also kind of embarrassing whenever anyone wanted to look through the telescope, and I couldnít find very many objects.

Iím not sure, but somehow I heard of ďTurn Left at OrionĒ. I picked up a copy and lo-and behold. It told me how to find various objects. I would venture to say that book is one of the most important items that a beginner should purchase. It gives directions on finding 100 interesting objects by star hopping, along with a section on lunar and planetary observing.

The first part of the book deals with lunar viewing. There are a number of photographs of various phases of the moon, along with interesting features. Another section deals with the planets and drawings of how they appear through a small telescope.

The major portion of the book has 100 objects visible through a small telescope; which run the gamut from multiple stars, to nebulas and galaxies. They are broken down by season. Each object has a rating of 1 to 4 telescopes. (the higher the number, the better the view). Following that is a star diagram, directions on how to find the object, and a drawing of how it looks through a telescope.

I found this an invaluable book. If you follow along, you too will be able to find the Blinking Planetary, or M13, M81 and 97 other objects.  Even though Iíve bought 3 copies, I do not happen to actually own one now. It seems that whenever I meet someone starting out I give mine away. However I am planning on purchasing yet another copy soon.

Pros: Excellent book invaluable for learning to find deep sky objects.

Cons: Canít seem to hang on to my copy.

Submitted by Anonymous

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