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Orion Silver Top Plossl 10mm and 25mm

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Date: NA
Price: NA
Design: Multi-coated 4-element Plossl
Description: Silver barrels and very simple design make these eyepieces actually look pretty good. The construction feels durable and the coatings are decent. Probably a 45-50 degree FOV.

Review

I decided to review both of these eyepieces at the same time because of the great similarities between them. They were both shipped with my telescope and arrived undamaged with it. Not expecting much from included eyepieces I was impressed with their construction and simple design. They actually looked like they may work.

They do. The first night out I used both of these extensively simply because they fill in the middle focal length section of my eyepiece box. On my Orion Skywatcher 120mm the 10mm offers 100x and the 25mm gives me 40x. The 25mm eyepiece probably gets the most use of the two showing a fairly wide field when touring deep sky objects. It also perfectly frames the disc of the moon allowing for an interesting view. The 10mm excels at my favorite targets the moon and the planets. It allows me to get in close to the moon but not too close. It is actually a good finder eyepiece for the moon when you are looking for small craters and rilles. On the planets (Jupiter and Saturn) the 10mm gives excellent views. Jupiter and its family fit into the FOV and many bands become visible on Jupiter. On Saturn the ring division becomes visible during decent seeing in the 10mm.

There are some negatives to these eyepieces. The 25mm does show some distortion near the edge of the field. There is also some glare when looking at bright objects such as Jupiter. But in general this has been an extremely useful eyepiece that I plan on keeping well into the future. The 10mm does not really have many major drawbacks that I can think of at this time. It is relatively sharp to the edge of the field and gives my 7.5mm Ultrascopic a run for its money. Overall on a scale of 10 the 25mm would get somewhere near an 8 while the 10mm deserves an 8.5.

Submitted by Curt Irwin - irwincur@excite.com - Grand Rapids, Michigan

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